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One Particular Irrefutable Fact On GSK1120212 That No One Is Revealing To You

?theobromae 24?days after pruning in November (Fig.?1). In the 2008 dormant season, pruning-wound susceptibility was higher in Chardonnay when wounds were inoculated with L.?theobromae 12?days after pruning in January (Fig.?2). For the rest of pruning dates, pruning-wound susceptibility to infection by both fungal species was highest when inoculations were done immediately after pruning (Fig.?2). Overall results showed that susceptibility of fresh pruning wounds was significantly higher (P?<?0��0001) when vines were pruned in December than when they were pruned in November, January, February or March. Susceptibility of fresh pruning wounds was significantly lower (P?<?0��0001) in both dormant seasons and both cultivars when vines were pruned in early March compared to pruning in November, December, January or February (Figs?1 and 2). Natural infections in the non-inoculated Chardonnay controls were 0% in November, <a href="http://www.selleckchem.com/products/gsk1120212-jtp-74057.html">selleck 5% and 3% in December, 1% and 4% in January, and 0% in both February and BGJ-398 March in the 2007 and 2008 dormant seasons, respectively. Natural infections in the non-inoculated Cabernet Sauvignon controls were 0% in November, 2% and 7% in December, 5% and 6% in January, 0% and 1% in February, and 0% in March in the 2007 and 2008 dormant seasons, respectively. Based on morphological characters, the fungal pathogens Diplodia seriata and E.?lata were identified from the non-inoculated Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon controls. Lasiodiplodia theobromae and N.?parvum were not isolated from the uninoculated controls. Other fungi, such as Alternaria sp., Aspergillus sp., Cladosporium sp., Penicillum this website sp. and Epicoccum sp. were also periodically isolated from both inoculated and non-inoculated pruning wounds in both seasons and both cultivars. In both the 2007 and 2008 dormant seasons, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon pruning wounds were susceptible to infection by L.?theobromae and N.?parvum to a varying degree throughout the duration of the experiment (Figs?1 and 2). In the 2007 dormant season, wounds made in November, December and January were susceptible for up to 7?weeks (Fig.?1). In the 2008 dormant season, wounds made in November and December were susceptible for up to 12?weeks (Fig.?2). Overall, susceptibility of pruning wounds decreased significantly as the length of time between pruning and inoculation increased (Table?4). During the first 12?days after pruning, vines pruned in February showed a more rapid decrease in susceptibility than those pruned in November, December or January (Figs?1 and 2). The lowest rate of infection was observed when vines were inoculated 12?days after pruning in March in the 2008 dormant season (<?10% infected wounds); however, susceptibility did not differ significantly (P?=?0��5421) vines inoculated 5?weeks after pruning in February (Fig.?2).</div>
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